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Wunderkind

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Wunderkind last won the day on November 9 2018

Wunderkind had the most liked content!

About Wunderkind

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    NetRunner

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  • Interests
    painting, body painting, gaming, generally avoiding responsibility

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  1. I still prefer Screaming Frog. To me it's a tool a lot like Scrapebox. When Scrapebox was popular, a lot of people were turned off by its interface. It was very basic and simple. That's how Screaming Frog appears too. Definitely designed by engineers. Tried Sitebulb. It's not bad. I did like the site structure visualization option, but like you said, once you get to bigger sites that feature quickly becomes pretty useless. Then Screaming Frog introduced the same feature, so I had no reason to even consider switching. I guess if you do a lot of site audits, Sitebulb might be of interest. They can export some decent looking reports, but unless they have changed it recently, you do not have much control over what gets into those reports. Some of the things that Sitebulb reports as an issues, I don't agree with, so that would get confusing to hand to a client.
  2. I know a lot of IM'ers use Mailchimp. They just recently changed their pricing and fee structures. Take note, this was written by someone who runs a competitor's product. Nevertheless, it does a good job outlining the changes. Also worth noting, these changes only impact free accounts and new paying subscribers. If you currently have a paid account with Mailchimp, this does not impact you, but I would not be surprised if this eventually rolls out to everyone. If you are on a free account and on the verge of hitting the point where you will have to pay, you are going to be put into the new pricing structure. A few notes: In this new plan, you will now be paying for everyone, including people who have unsubscribed from your lists. They took away the ability to send unlimited emails on paid accounts. Mailchimp, like the old days of limited data and text plans on smartphones, is introducing overage charges. If your subscriber number hits the next tier level, instead of just upgrading you to the next plan, you will be upgraded AND charged an overage fee. Users will need to stay on top of their list counts as they approach the next pricing tier. Lastly, they are gating a lot of their features in the different plan tiers. Previously, almost every feature was open to users at every tier, including free users. I had moved from Aweber to Constant Contact to Mailchimp. Might be time to look for a new service. I have always hated their clunky ass interface anyhow.
  3. I can't believe I never knew this existed. It's so simple and yet works so well. Thank you for sharing this.
  4. I'm with you guys. Keyword cannibalization is one of the more dumb concepts I can remember seeing pop up in the SEO community. I have many keywords with multiple pages ranking to prove it.
  5. Not sure if anyone saw this, but Google launched a new Google My Business spam complaint form. https://www.seroundtable.com/google-my-business-spam-report-form-27183.html It's supposed to be used for GMB listings that lead to fraudulent or misleading content. I know there are a lot of people out there making a living with fake GMB listings that are generating leads they sell off. I would imagine competitors are going to use this form to report those listings. I wouldn't be surprised if Google uses this data to crowd source a solution to those local lead generating listings. If that is your only source of income, I would start diversifying now.
  6. If you upgraded to 5.0, make sure you install their latest security update. They made a bit of a fuck that can expose user passwords. It's not as bad as that sounds. It's only on users that have been created since the update and only if they were using the default generated password. Likely a minimal impact across the community. https://www.zdnet.com/google-amp/article/wordpress-plugs-bug-that-led-to-google-indexing-some-user-passwords/
  7. Wow that is a bad looking site. Ranking well or not, they can't be getting many conversions. That being said, if they are ranking in the 3-pack, I wonder how many people see the phone number there and just call without ever visiting the site. Still, dress it up a little bit. Geez.
  8. Methinks you are a dirty rotten spammer. Time will tell.
  9. I noticed this too. I migrated two sites three weeks ago that were pretty good sized (that's what she said) and saw zero bumps.
  10. I heard with this new feature they now got it down to 79%, so progress.
  11. Really depends on the business. For a lot of service oriented businesses, people are not going to be looking for it on YouTube, Twitter, or Facebook. If I want to shop for a new life insurance policy, I'm not going to look for it on Facebook. I'm going to Google. If I want to find a local bar that people seem to like, I might go to Facebook. Probably Yelp first to be honest. Even Google then. Once I find a place I like, I'll probably follow them on Facebook, but that is very unlikely to be my first point of contact.
  12. So to summarize... Dan is basically a motivational speaker. Lots of tips on taking action and giving you reasons to take action. Very little direction on what that action should be. And WF is still noob land run by other noobs. I think that about sums the thread up. Did I miss anything?
  13. Nope. She definitely does not compose content in WP. Hate messing around with anything in their editor. And I remembered that Yoast had a reading score feature, but didn't realize they use the same one. It's been a long time since I used Yoast for anything on the page/post level. SEMrush's tool does a better job all around.
  14. Are that many people really not using Tag Manager? What the heck are web designers doing?
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