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Mike Friedman

How Quality Score Impacts Ad Rank

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I have an article that will be published tomorrow on my site that discusses Quality Score in Google AdWords. 

It was prompted by a consultation I recently did with a business spending thousands per month on AdWords, and the team in charge of their campaign did not understand how Quality Score impacted their ad positioning and cost per click. 

I put together this simple chart to explain it, and figured others might benefit from it too.

AdRank.jpg

For those not familiar with Ad Rank, the higher your Ad Rank, the better ad position you get. 

Quality Score is given on a range of 1-10. Google developed it as a way to level the playing field a little bit. Instead of AdWords just being a straight auction, they made it a little more complicated to give smaller advertisers a chance to compete with companies that have deeper pockets. 

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SEOPress WordPress SEO plugin

I realize this isn't completely relevant but there's a decent list of negative keywords at http://www.paidinsights.com/400-negative-keywords/

It also shows you how to setup a shared library to make this easier.

There's a spreadsheet over at blackhatppc.co.uk as well, which I don't recommend black hat PPC, they just have a nice spreadsheet that's free.

This only matters if you do broad matching, but if you know anything about how people search, people search tons of weird variations and you may or may not want your ad to appear on those searches.

For example, lets pretend I sell survival knives in an online store exclusively. Lets say I've determined that I want to target the broad keyword "Survival Knife", well I definitely don't want my ad to show on "Survival Knife Course" and probably not "Survival Knife Florida" .

Just wanted to mention it since it's another Adwords mistake that I know occurs frequently.

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6 hours ago, mki said:

I realize this isn't completely relevant but there's a decent list of negative keywords at http://www.paidinsights.com/400-negative-keywords/

It also shows you how to setup a shared library to make this easier.

There's a spreadsheet over at blackhatppc.co.uk as well, which I don't recommend black hat PPC, they just have a nice spreadsheet that's free.

This only matters if you do broad matching, but if you know anything about how people search, people search tons of weird variations and you may or may not want your ad to appear on those searches.

For example, lets pretend I sell survival knives in an online store exclusively. Lets say I've determined that I want to target the broad keyword "Survival Knife", well I definitely don't want my ad to show on "Survival Knife Course" and probably not "Survival Knife Florida" .

Just wanted to mention it since it's another Adwords mistake that I know occurs frequently.

Negative keywords might be the biggest money saver and way to improve CTR out there. Also might be one of the biggest mistakes people make by including the wrong negative keywords and tanking their whole campaign.

This is the article I published, and I do include a section about negative keywords.

http://theseopub.com/cut-adwords-costs-half-understanding-quality-score/

The example I use is if you have a website selling healthy snacks. You might be target healthy snacks as a broad or phrase match term, but people may search for healthy snacks for pets. You don't want that traffic, or even the impressions for your ads because it will kill your CTR. You need to add things like pets, dogs, cats, birds, etc. as negative keywords.

 

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18 hours ago, Mike Friedman said:

Negative keywords might be the biggest money saver and way to improve CTR out there. Also might be one of the biggest mistakes people make by including the wrong negative keywords and tanking their whole campaign.

I hate to say it but this is another one of these "You just have to have the experience before Google killed it" situations.

Before Google moved the SSL, you used to get most of the search query strings, now you only get a handful. I remember looking at my logs and thinking "Wow really? Somebody actually typed that and got to my site" many times. Both good and bad.

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4 hours ago, mki said:

I hate to say it but this is another one of these "You just have to have the experience before Google killed it" situations.

Before Google moved the SSL, you used to get most of the search query strings, now you only get a handful. I remember looking at my logs and thinking "Wow really? Somebody actually typed that and got to my site" many times. Both good and bad.

For organic search traffic that is true. For AdWords, you get the full data. There are no (not provided) in your AdWords data.

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