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daronch

Is This Considered Dofollow?

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Is the below link code considered a dofollow?

<a target="_blank" href="http://example.com" id="ember3615" class="pv-contact-info__action ember-view"> example.com&nbsp; </a>

 

<a rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank" href="http://example.com" id="ember1882" class="link-without-visited-state ember-view"> example.com </a>

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Web Hosting

That's two separate a tags, first yes, second no. If you got this link and are unsure, disable java-script in the developer toolbar and refresh the page, check the source. The class is a bit weird.

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5 hours ago, mki said:

That's two separate a tags, first yes, second no. If you got this link and are unsure, disable java-script in the developer toolbar and refresh the page, check the source. The class is a bit weird.

So for the 2nd one, it is the rel="noopener noreferrer" that makes it nofollow?

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4 hours ago, daronch said:

So for the 2nd one, it is the rel="noopener noreferrer" that makes it nofollow?

My bad, I thought it said nofollow. Noreferrer does exactly what you would think it would do.

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9 hours ago, mki said:

My bad, I thought it said nofollow. Noreferrer does exactly what you would think it would do.

 

6 hours ago, mkgg said:

Both are dofollow

Thanks guys. They're from LinkedIn profile and company pages. Got me excited for a while as I thought they've permanently dofollow their links. But as it turns out, they are visible only when logged in, and this makes them nofollow right?

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6 minutes ago, daronch said:

 

Thanks guys. They're from LinkedIn profile and company pages. Got me excited for a while as I thought they've permanently dofollow their links. But as it turns out, they are visible only when logged in, and this makes them nofollow right?

Googlebot doesn't log in to anything.

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30 minutes ago, mki said:

Googlebot doesn't log in to anything.

Got myself excited for nothing.

How about pinterest and reddit as I see they're dofollow as well. Are they worth building on if I can raise their 'page authority'?

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I thought pinterest was nofollow. If you want to try to get links on reddit sure, but those links are usually pretty weak.

You really need to do a real SEO technique though. You seem kind of new so I'll try my best to point you in the right direction.

Depending on what you are trying to rank there's a few schools of thought.

If Google is likely to penalize the site on a manual review due to the nature of the site and it's content, there's no real point in investing the huge amount of time required to do white hat SEO. So people who have sites like that either spam, or hand build links in from any site that will give them a followed link. Whats kind of screwed up about these techniques, is that they actually do require a lot of involvement, regarding knowing what works and doesn't, and the sites will just get penalized anyways. So at the end of the day, Blackhat really is just a big waste of time. There's no quality discussion of this stuff anywhere.

Real SEO, or what corporations engage in, is almost purely marketing techniques, such as link outreach/general outreach (relationship building)/content marketing through outreach. They generally refer to the specific marketing types by name rather than even calling it SEO. Creating an infographic and marketing it to influencers on facebook/twitter/bloggers is really just marketing. From experience, the benefit is mostly traffic/social shares/visibility, which is obviously what established corporations want. If they get 10 links out of the campaign, great, but they probably already have 1k+ linking domains so that's just a drop in the bucket. Obviously companies that want to do well in Google and have the resources, engage in industrial scale link building outreach campaigns. They might have 20+ people prospecting links and sending emails, all coordinating through a CRM. The process isn't a secret, just Google it. This really should never get a site penalized, all they're doing is communicating with other websites and asking for links, one way or another. My personal success rates with link outreach was like .5%, using personalized emails (this works better for building social media accounts up these days.) This obviously works better for recognizable brands.

Whitehat is techniques that are generally safe and not spammy, such as guest posting, broken link building, sponsorship, submitting links on sites that are relevant (like directories), or submitting content to sites that accept it (there's tons of other techniques.) There's a low, yet accepted level of risk with these techniques. This is usually only a problem when any single technique is done to an extreme amount, or the person doing it, starts to get overzealous with using keywords as anchor texts. Which if your name is on the content, I recommend you avoid entirely, since it's the single biggest penalty magnet. Most small team/independent SEOs, are more focused on building up their authority anyways, and there's no real reason to even have target keywords as anchor texts, it's less effective but it's 10000% safer. There are people who just followed that rule and did over 1k guest posts and they're ranking just fine, no penalties, but I would never recommend doing that many. The reality is, to build a real business with limited capital, you have to take on some risk and a .2-.5% success rate is too ineffective and costly.

Greyhat: Generally gray area stuff such as private networks. Somewhat safe when done right, dangerous when done wrong. These techniques do not really get discussed anywhere in any detail in public.

A good course to start is from majestic and it's free. -> https://www.udemy.com/getup-to-speed-with-majestic-link-building/

ahrefs.com, semrush.com, and moz.com have quality content as well (all whitehat/marketing stuff.)

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13 hours ago, daronch said:

Got myself excited for nothing.

How about pinterest and reddit as I see they're dofollow as well. Are they worth building on if I can raise their 'page authority'?

In order to build a page's authority, you have to get good quality links pointing to that page. If you can do that, why not just have them point straight to your site instead of diluting them by going through Pinteres, Reddit, or any other domain?

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14 hours ago, daronch said:

Got myself excited for nothing.

How about pinterest and reddit as I see they're dofollow as well. Are they worth building on if I can raise their 'page authority'?

Just my opinion, but I've never seen any long-term value from investing the time it takes in using sites like these for one other reason besides what Mike mentioned - if you're banned from the site or they close your account, BOOM - all your work is gone. Any link juice is gone along with it, so if you were using them just for SEO, you probably wasted a lot of time and effort. 

This happens a lot and you have to go into it understanding that you have no control over what they do. 

 

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16 minutes ago, BIG Mike said:

Just my opinion, but I've never seen any long-term value from investing the time it takes in using sites like these for one other reason besides what Mike mentioned - if you're banned from the site or they close your account, BOOM - all your work is gone. Any link juice is gone along with it, so if you were using them just for SEO, you probably wasted a lot of time and effort. 

This happens a lot and you have to go into it understanding that you have no control over what they do. 

 

Yes. I remember a lot of businesses drying up when Squidoo went nofollow...

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Just now, Mike Friedman said:

Yes. I remember a lot of businesses drying up when Squidoo went nofollow...

Yeah, that was insane...

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1 minute ago, Mike Friedman said:

The bellyaching was, yes. Never understood why anyone would want to build a business on something they did not own and had no control over.

That's because they felt a huge sense of entitlement, without bothering to read the fine print. 

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Just now, BIG Mike said:

That's because they felt a huge sense of entitlement, without bothering to read the fine print. 

My favorite part was the people crying that they had "built Squidoo into what it was". 

Nope. Most of you were just blood sucking vampires publishing total garbage.

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7 hours ago, Mike Friedman said:

The bellyaching was, yes. Never understood why anyone would want to build a business on something they did not own and had no control over.

Well, that depends...

Look at Youtube, most of those successful channels would have never made a dime on a self hosted website.

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12 hours ago, Mike Friedman said:

In order to build a page's authority, you have to get good quality links pointing to that page. If you can do that, why not just have them point straight to your site instead of diluting them by going through Pinteres, Reddit, or any other domain?

It doesn't always require high quality or even many links for their page authority to go up? I've seen some accounts with barely 1-2 backlinks and their PA goes up to >45. Granted other metrics may also have positively influenced it.

10 hours ago, BIG Mike said:

Just my opinion, but I've never seen any long-term value from investing the time it takes in using sites like these for one other reason besides what Mike mentioned - if you're banned from the site or they close your account, BOOM - all your work is gone. Any link juice is gone along with it, so if you were using them just for SEO, you probably wasted a lot of time and effort. 

This happens a lot and you have to go into it understanding that you have no control over what they do. 

The reason is that I do use some of these social or web 2.0 sites without taking into account their SEO value, so I thought I may as well try to increase their authority by doing some 'white hat' seo or something similar. Also, from what I've seen, it doesn't take much effort at all for some of these high authority domains to increase the PA of their pages, correct me if I'm wrong. 

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On 2017-5-28 at 10:06 AM, mki said:

I thought pinterest was nofollow. If you want to try to get links on reddit sure, but those links are usually pretty weak.

You really need to do a real SEO technique though. You seem kind of new so I'll try my best to point you in the right direction.

Depending on what you are trying to rank there's a few schools of thought.

If Google is likely to penalize the site on a manual review due to the nature of the site and it's content, there's no real point in investing the huge amount of time required to do white hat SEO. So people who have sites like that either spam, or hand build links in from any site that will give them a followed link. Whats kind of screwed up about these techniques, is that they actually do require a lot of involvement, regarding knowing what works and doesn't, and the sites will just get penalized anyways. So at the end of the day, Blackhat really is just a big waste of time. There's no quality discussion of this stuff anywhere.

Real SEO, or what corporations engage in, is almost purely marketing techniques, such as link outreach/general outreach (relationship building)/content marketing through outreach. They generally refer to the specific marketing types by name rather than even calling it SEO. Creating an infographic and marketing it to influencers on facebook/twitter/bloggers is really just marketing. From experience, the benefit is mostly traffic/social shares/visibility, which is obviously what established corporations want. If they get 10 links out of the campaign, great, but they probably already have 1k+ linking domains so that's just a drop in the bucket. Obviously companies that want to do well in Google and have the resources, engage in industrial scale link building outreach campaigns. They might have 20+ people prospecting links and sending emails, all coordinating through a CRM. The process isn't a secret, just Google it. This really should never get a site penalized, all they're doing is communicating with other websites and asking for links, one way or another. My personal success rates with link outreach was like .5%, using personalized emails (this works better for building social media accounts up these days.) This obviously works better for recognizable brands.

Whitehat is techniques that are generally safe and not spammy, such as guest posting, broken link building, sponsorship, submitting links on sites that are relevant (like directories), or submitting content to sites that accept it (there's tons of other techniques.) There's a low, yet accepted level of risk with these techniques. This is usually only a problem when any single technique is done to an extreme amount, or the person doing it, starts to get overzealous with using keywords as anchor texts. Which if your name is on the content, I recommend you avoid entirely, since it's the single biggest penalty magnet. Most small team/independent SEOs, are more focused on building up their authority anyways, and there's no real reason to even have target keywords as anchor texts, it's less effective but it's 10000% safer. There are people who just followed that rule and did over 1k guest posts and they're ranking just fine, no penalties, but I would never recommend doing that many. The reality is, to build a real business with limited capital, you have to take on some risk and a .2-.5% success rate is too ineffective and costly.

Greyhat: Generally gray area stuff such as private networks. Somewhat safe when done right, dangerous when done wrong. These techniques do not really get discussed anywhere in any detail in public.

A good course to start is from majestic and it's free. -> https://www.udemy.com/getup-to-speed-with-majestic-link-building/

ahrefs.com, semrush.com, and moz.com have quality content as well (all whitehat/marketing stuff.)

Thanks for this comprehensive reply. Never knew there're so many white hat seo techniques. I will definitely look more into them as I am building a website that I hope will be around for a long-time.

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12 hours ago, yukon said:

Well, that depends...

Look at Youtube, most of those successful channels would have never made a dime on a self hosted website.

Well, that's true. Although, I would say that YouTube is a much more stable platform to build upon. The big streamers are not relying on links from YouTube to get traffic. Google is getting a share of the profits, so they are unlikely to make any radical sweeping changes to the advertising model. YouTube is the second biggest search engine behind Google. Not likely to go anywhere. 

But there were certainly some people that invested the time and energy into growing on YouTube when it looked like a much less certain platform.

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9 hours ago, daronch said:

It doesn't always require high quality or even many links for their page authority to go up? I've seen some accounts with barely 1-2 backlinks and their PA goes up to >45. Granted other metrics may also have positively influenced it.

Which just shows how lousy and inaccurate of a metric PA can be.

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7 hours ago, Mike Friedman said:

Which just shows how lousy and inaccurate of a metric PA can be.

Which metric will be more accurate?

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Just now, daronch said:

Which metric will be more accurate?

None of the metrics are really all that accurate. They are reference points. If you are going to use them, I would use all of them. At least if they all line up, you can feel better about what they are telling you. The problem with all of them though is they have nowhere near the data that Google does. Also, the further we get from the last public PR update the less we really know about how Google evaluates links and passes on authority. PR updates always gave metrics like that a bit of a bar to see if they were on the right track or not.

I would say that MozRank has always been far more accurate than PA. Just one of them can be way off the mark.

Like I said though, I would look at all of them if you are going to use them... PA, MozRank, CF, TF, DomainRank... 

 

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