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Wunderkind

Let's Talk Conversions

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I'm curious to hear about some tips and ideas people have used and tested to improve conversions. This is something I have been focusing on hard this year in my business. I always want more traffic, but why not be as efficient as possible with the traffic I get?

My sites range from affiliate sales to lead generation and just about everything in between. 

Some basic things I have tested are color schemes, colors of buy buttons, and sizes of buy buttons.

Color schemes did not really seem to play a role in conversions on my sites. I did some A/B testing with different color schemes. Nothing drastic, but things like the colors you find in headers, navigation menus, etc. None of the tests really stuck out with a clear winner.

For buy buttons, variations of yellows and orange worked the best for me. They are pretty common among big retailers like Amazon. These weren't drastic differences, but in the 6-8% better conversion range. Over the life of the site, that is a big deal. I tested yellow, orange, red, blue, and green. I used some different shades of each too. Blue performed the worst, but not by a lot. I was kind of surprised by that and in my head expected red to be the worst. It was right behind the yellow and orange ones though.

I played around with different sizes in buy buttons too. Nothing gigantic, but I went as big as 375 pixels wide and 100 pixels high. I went as small as 75 pixels wide and 35 pixels high. Can't really go with anything less than 35 pixels high or you start to get too small and will be looking at some really cramped text. Really did not see a difference here.

I screwed up this testing though on two of my sites. On the big button I had something like "Apply now for great rates" as the text. That wouldn't fit on the smaller sized buttons, so I had to go with something like "Apply now". This added an extra variable to the whole thing. Miscommunication between me and the web designer. I'm going to try this again and use "Apply now" on both to get a more accurate result.

This was the big aha moment for me. I started adding buy buttons or forms for my lead generation sites that stayed on the screen as the user scrolled. Did it for a few email capture forms too. So basically, when the person scrolls down the content, the form or button is stuck to their screen. Most are in a sidebar. A couple email captures I did in bars at the bottom of the screen. The conversion results were dramatically better from this. All of them went up. A few saw conversions improve by almost 40%. Some were more mild in the 10% range. I noticed that the milder improvements were also generally attached to higher ticket items or lead generation forms that were a little tougher sale (think something like "put your number here now and we will call you" versus just adding a name and email address).

I am totally sold on the sticky call to action thing now. 

I should add that all of the sticky conversion tabs and buttons were added to sites between 37 and 46 days ago. I'm comparing them to conversion data over the previous year, and I do not have them running A/B tests. It is possible I just hit a string of great luck, but there is enough data there across multiple sites, many in totally unrelated niches, that I feel confident in the results. Maybe they will cool off a bit, but I'm still sold on what I am seeing.

Curious to hear other conversion tips and ideas people have tried and tested. 

 

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Kudos to you for actually taking the time and making the effort to understand your market and tweaking your sites to maximize conversions - so many folks fail to do this, it's always great to hear about someone genuinely doing it. 

The only tip I have for you is to continue to explore and learn from what the large retailers are doing (rather than IM'ers). Since you picked up on the orange/yellow buttons like Amazon uses, you'll benefit from looking at what the rest of them do (but continue to test them in your market). 

I spent a lot of time (years) testing everything I could think of and the most important thing I came away from that with is that every market is different, often in subtle ways. For example, if you're selling to IM'ers, there are certain things they expect to see - alternatively, if you're promoting holistic products, it's a completely different ballgame. 

Keep doing what you're doing...

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I'm a big fan of those floating type of call-to-action boxes. I started playing with them about 3 years ago and have never looked back. The results were too good. I don't think I have built a site since that did not use them to some degree. That one thing had the biggest impact on my conversions over anything I have ever tested.

I never thought to try different sizes of buy now buttons. That is an interesting idea. Kind of surprised you didn't see more drastic differences there, but that's why we test stuff. Can never assume.

 

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What about prices? What are some thoughts on price points?

Of course, $299 is thought to be a better price than $300. In the customer's mind, that one dollar between the two seems like a bigger jump than just $1.

But what about $289? Will the conversions improve enough over $299 to make up the difference in a situation like that?

It seems like in the IM world, the number 7 is used a lot for some reason. Everything is $27 or $47 or $247. What is with the 7? Has anyone tested this?

 

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On 6/1/2017 at 7:37 AM, Mike Friedman said:

I'm a big fan of those floating type of call-to-action boxes. I started playing with them about 3 years ago and have never looked back. The results were too good. I don't think I have built a site since that did not use them to some degree. That one thing had the biggest impact on my conversions over anything I have ever tested.

I never thought to try different sizes of buy now buttons. That is an interesting idea. Kind of surprised you didn't see more drastic differences there, but that's why we test stuff. Can never assume.

 

For local businesses (lawyers, doctors, CPAs, dentists, etc.) what do you put in those floating type boxes? Phone numbers? Lead magnet? I tried lead magnets in my niche and it doesn't work too well. Same as a bunch of other people

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23 minutes ago, deezn said:

For local businesses (lawyers, doctors, CPAs, dentists, etc.) what do you put in those floating type boxes? Phone numbers? Lead magnet? I tried lead magnets in my niche and it doesn't work too well. Same as a bunch of other people

Kind of depends on the business and what they offer. Some dentists will do a free cleaning on your first visit. Lawyers might do a free consultation. That kind of stuff. If nothing else, then a call now message.

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I've seen those floating buttons and when they don't interfere with the text, they don't bother me, and it  makes it easier to click if you decide instead of hunting for it. However, some people are sticking them where they interfere with reading.  I just ditch the site at that point.  Having anything interfere with my reading annoys me to no end. 

 

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55 minutes ago, HeySal said:

I've seen those floating buttons and when they don't interfere with the text, they don't bother me, and it  makes it easier to click if you decide instead of hunting for it. However, some people are sticking them where they interfere with reading.  I just ditch the site at that point.  Having anything interfere with my reading annoys me to no end. 

 

I agree Sal, however, I've seen them pop up when a site user is about to close the site (they know! LOL) and I've always thought that was really clever.

When they grey the text but you can close them, I'm not so annoyed.  But, if they don't have a close option, them I'm out.  There's 200 million other sites sitting there waiting for you to visit.  Those instances always remind me that I'm not my market!

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On 6/1/2017 at 10:37 AM, Mike Friedman said:

I'm a big fan of those floating type of call-to-action boxes. I started playing with them about 3 years ago and have never looked back. The results were too good. I don't think I have built a site since that did not use them to some degree. That one thing had the biggest impact on my conversions over anything I have ever tested.

I never thought to try different sizes of buy now buttons. That is an interesting idea. Kind of surprised you didn't see more drastic differences there, but that's why we test stuff. Can never assume.

 

Is there a particular service you suggest for this? I've seen a few companies that offer this, and you just put a snippet of code on your site. 

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38 minutes ago, ShayB said:

Is there a particular service you suggest for this? I've seen a few companies that offer this, and you just put a snippet of code on your site. 

No service is necessary. It's just CSS coding.

For Wordpress, there are also plugins that will do it.

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On 6/16/2017 at 2:48 PM, ShayB said:

Is there a particular service you suggest for this? I've seen a few companies that offer this, and you just put a snippet of code on your site. 

As Mike said, it's CSS; and simple CSS at that. The most common technique sets the "Display" property to "Fixed", which keeps it from scrolling off the screen. There's also a "Z-Index" property you want to set to 2 or higher to make sure your box is the topmost one. 

Sal brought up a good point - mainstream sites (non-IM) tend to float the box to the far right or left of the browser window, to keep the content clear for a better user experience. 

 

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On 6/19/2017 at 7:11 AM, BIG Mike said:

Sal brought up a good point - mainstream sites (non-IM) tend to float the box to the far right or left of the browser window, to keep the content clear for a better user experience. 

Yes. The box is always on the right or left sidebar and separate from the content. No overlap. If it is a small form, like just an email address and submit button, it can also be fixed at either the top or bottom of the page.

It's always in view though. That's the key thing.

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3 hours ago, Wirenut said:

Does someone have an example of this?  

Here is one on Neil Patel's blog if you can ignore the annoying popups.

https://www.quicksprout.com/blog/

As you scroll down, you will notice the call-to-action box on the right stays on the screen. 

This could be a form, a click-to-call button, etc. Whatever it is you want the visitors to do.

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I see.   I like when a thin line stays at the top with the company name, number, and other information.

Actually, now that I think about it, the seo pub is like that.  The logo gets smaller and remains at the top with other useful options.  This way no matter where someone is on the page they never have to look around for a way to engage.

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22 minutes ago, Wirenut said:

I see.   I like when a thin line stays at the top with the company name, number, and other information.

Actually, now that I think about it, the seo pub is like that.  The logo gets smaller and remains at the top with other useful options.  This way no matter where someone is on the page they never have to look around for a way to engage.

And most importantly, the 'Request a Quote" button stays in their face.

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3 hours ago, Mike Friedman said:

Here is one on Neil Patel's blog if you can ignore the annoying popups.

https://www.quicksprout.com/blog/

As you scroll down, you will notice the call-to-action box on the right stays on the screen. 

This could be a form, a click-to-call button, etc. Whatever it is you want the visitors to do.

Unlike that page that pops up and you have to get rid of, that little box on the side is very unobtrusive.  It  doesn't get in your way reading, but is right there.  I can see how that could result in a lot of clicks........................unlike that whole page wall of ads that pops up while you're in the middle of reading. Those are the things that will disgust me so hard, I'll just leave the website altogether. 

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9 hours ago, HeySal said:

Unlike that page that pops up and you have to get rid of, that little box on the side is very unobtrusive.  It  doesn't get in your way reading, but is right there.  I can see how that could result in a lot of clicks........................unlike that whole page wall of ads that pops up while you're in the middle of reading. Those are the things that will disgust me so hard, I'll just leave the website altogether. 

Yeah, nothing too annoying, but still in plain view. I would never design a page that obstructs the visitors from doing what they want to do. At the same time, I'll use flashing arrows and neon lights if I have to in order to get someone's attention.

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20 hours ago, Mike Friedman said:

Yeah, nothing too annoying, but still in plain view. I would never design a page that obstructs the visitors from doing what they want to do. At the same time, I'll use flashing arrows and neon lights if I have to in order to get someone's attention.

A bunch of lawyers use Ngage live chat and Apex which sometimes has a lightbox that blocks the rest of the page. It converts WELL.

I know for a fact, there is one PI lawyer who is killing it with their website. And is obsessive with testing everything on their site (and I mean everything). It's not a lightbox, but it's a popover that you have to X out of. If it didn't work, they wouldn't use it.

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11 hours ago, deezn said:

A bunch of lawyers use Ngage live chat and Apex which sometimes has a lightbox that blocks the rest of the page. It converts WELL.

I know for a fact, there is one PI lawyer who is killing it with their website. And is obsessive with testing everything on their site (and I mean everything). It's not a lightbox, but it's a popover that you have to X out of. If it didn't work, they wouldn't use it.

That's the thing about testing everything obsessively - because what works in one market might bomb in another. 

The other day I clicked an ad on Facebook for a guy's sling bag and wham - got a light box and a subscribe form with no way to close it. So I bailed out, because I'm not subscribing to a list just for the privilege of seeing something I might purchase. Maybe they tested it, maybe not, but I doubt it's converting well for them...

To me it's just stupid to completely block your visitors from seeing your products without jumping through hoops. It's reminiscent of those sales pages with the long videos (controls disabled) forcing you to sit through them before getting to the real sales page or price (I always bail on those too). 

Over the years I've done an enormous amount of testing on my sales pages (primarily selling scripts\software) and I know what works for me as well as what my prospective customers want. 

That said, I wouldn't presume to comment on other markets that react completely differently to what's happening on the page other than to recommend test everything over and over. 

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13 hours ago, deezn said:

A bunch of lawyers use Ngage live chat and Apex which sometimes has a lightbox that blocks the rest of the page. It converts WELL.

I know for a fact, there is one PI lawyer who is killing it with their website. And is obsessive with testing everything on their site (and I mean everything). It's not a lightbox, but it's a popover that you have to X out of. If it didn't work, they wouldn't use it.

 

I believe it. Every market is a little different. What works in one won't necessarily work in another. 

And it's not just whether or not to have a popup box like that, but also what it says in the popup box. That has to be tested as much as whether or not to have one. Then you have to test if an immediate popup works better than one of those where it is delayed 10-15 seconds after the person has been on the page. 

 

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6 hours ago, Mike Friedman said:

 

I believe it. Every market is a little different. What works in one won't necessarily work in another. 

And it's not just whether or not to have a popup box like that, but also what it says in the popup box. That has to be tested as much as whether or not to have one. Then you have to test if an immediate popup works better than one of those where it is delayed 10-15 seconds after the person has been on the page. 

 

Yup. 

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On 6/27/2017 at 11:26 PM, Mike Friedman said:

Yes. The box is always on the right or left sidebar and separate from the content. No overlap. If it is a small form, like just an email address and submit button, it can also be fixed at either the top or bottom of the page.

It's always in view though. That's the key thing.

Exactly! If I get a giant in your face pop-up as soon as I get to a page, I'm done. Or wait until I'm reading then shove it in my face, I'm done! It annoys the crap out of me. But a smaller discreet box at the bottom or side that doesn't interfere with the rest of the page is perfect.

 

Terra

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On 6/15/2017 at 6:24 AM, Wunderkind said:

What about prices? What are some thoughts on price points?

Of course, $299 is thought to be a better price than $300. In the customer's mind, that one dollar between the two seems like a bigger jump than just $1.

But what about $289? Will the conversions improve enough over $299 to make up the difference in a situation like that?

It seems like in the IM world, the number 7 is used a lot for some reason. Everything is $27 or $47 or $247. What is with the 7? Has anyone tested this?

 

I've tested a few price techniques on one of my sites.  My audience is local, small business owners.  Here, at least, something like $300 would work better than $299.  I tested the 7 theory too, say $297, it just confused people!  LOL!  From my tests, though, confusion kept the price from sticking in their brains while we were talking about the service provided. 

Another test I did, was pricing my home.  I had it up for sale and instead of the standard pricing technique say, $240,900 (there's usually the '900' at the end), I used crazy numbers like $245,850.  That's just an example, but it seemed to work.  Buyers seemed to focus on the features of the home and not so much the price.  The first number was what caught their budget limits, not the rest. 

My other test was using A, B, C, pricing.  Offering three packages and B being the optimal one.  C was always a high price with a lot of features that most small business owners wouldn't really understand, but it was a great upsell.  I made B easy to read and capture their attention.  A was always minimal services.  No matter which package they wanted to talk about, there was always an upsell available. 

I did a small amount of split testing 'buy now' buttons as well.  I did this on a directory type site.  I found that most would pay for a listing on the site as long as they got a download of some sort as opposed to just paying for a listing. 

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