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Lanfear63

Wireless N "AC" For Much Faster Wireless Internet

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A tech report for those speed freaks who want faster wireless internet.

Something I recently read about and acted on. Within the last year I purchased an Asus AC3200 router. What I did not know about at the time was that "AC'" was a new protocol for wireless N and the router supported it., First it was wireless G, then N (faster) followed by some numbers, now wireless N AC

Wireless N AC gives you much faster wireless. But, your router must support it and so must one or more of the devices you use. Unfortunately my 2014 laptop did not. So, how do I get it.

Well, long story short I quickly established that all I needed to get was a little Wireless N AC dongle to go into my Laptop USB 3 (OR 2 port if that's all you have, 3 is faster)) So I got this well reviewed little baby.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B071KV2SMV/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 (no affliate link)

Tiny little thing, hardly protrudes from the laptop at all and no antennas required to plug into it or protrude from it, they are in the device.

So, it arrived today so I installed the drivers from a mini cd provided and slotted it in.

Results: My Normal internet speed, plugged in is 100 megs per second max, usually runs about 95 mbs. On laptops and other devices, wirelessly, I typically get 45-50 mbps. Fast but quite a big drop compared to plugged in.

After plugging in this tiny device on my laptop it took over as the primary internet wifi card and my speed went up from 45-50 mbps to between 82-90 mbps.

Quite a big jump you will agree.

So if you are in the market for a new router and laptop. Make sure the router supports Wireless N AC and the same applies to the laptop or other device except on an older laptop, not too old, you can update it with this or a similar dongle.

Whatever you're internet speed, it will make your wireless speed nearly as fast as plugged in.

Tec Support.

PS. This device is not available to work on a Mac though Apple may have their own.

Update, drivers are available for Mac. Support OS: MAC 10.7~10.12

https://www.asus.com/us/Networking/USB-AC53-Nano/HelpDesk_Download/

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10 hours ago, Lanfear63 said:

Whatever you're internet speed, it will make your wireless speed nearly as fast as plugged in.

PS. This device is not available to work on a Mac though Apple may have their own.

Is this really a thing? People craving faster W-fi?

Personally, I'm hard-wried with Ethernet, so this is lost on me. I guess it must be a thing as for the past year there has been an increasing number of ridiculous TV commercials making it appear that this is something that humans can't live without and that your Wi-fi speed is directly related to your social status. Am I really that far outside of the mainstream of American society? It seems that all things that preoccupy the thoughts and dreams of most Americans, don't even register on my radar.

Possibly just another benefit of old age. I'm in no hurry to get anywhere, on the Internet or off.

I just realized that I do have Wi-fi turned on for my Sonos home theater, surround sound system and I do have a Linksys AE9500 router, but that's just because I like nice things. Don't really think I have an actual use for that. More money than brains, I guess. That said, I did get a great deal on it when I purchased it with the Sony 75" 4k TV. Even I like a good deal when I can get one.  :-)

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2 hours ago, The AMOL said:

Is this really a thing? People craving faster W-fi?

Personally, I'm hard-wried with Ethernet, so this is lost on me. I guess it must be a thing as for the past year there has been an increasing number of ridiculous TV commercials making it appear that this is something that humans can't live without and that your Wi-fi speed is directly related to your social status. Am I really that far outside of the mainstream of American society? It seems that all things that preoccupy the thoughts and dreams of most Americans, don't even register on my radar.

Possibly just another benefit of old age. I'm in no hurry to get anywhere, on the Internet or off.

I just realized that I do have Wi-fi turned on for my Sonos home theater, surround sound system and I do have a Linksys AE9500 router, but that's just because I like nice things. Don't really think I have an actual use for that. More money than brains, I guess. That said, I did get a great deal on it when I purchased it with the Sony 75" 4k TV. Even I like a good deal when I can get one.  :-)

It's just something I read about and realised I had the gear to do it and to update a device does not cost much. I suppose you could look at as a way of cutting the cord. If you ever had the whim to relocate your setup to another location in your house you could do so without having to setup extending the ethernet "plugged in" access to it and retain most of the speed. 

That would be a boon to some. All Desktop PC's and Macs have Wifi built in these days. Not all have N AC wireless, even now. 

 

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3 hours ago, The AMOL said:

The only whim I have is to die right here and then dumped in the lake.

And miss out on the proud epitaph, I knew Frank Falcone, he was quirky and grouchy, sometimes just plain difficult to get along with, but I'll say one thing about this guy, and no-one can take it away from him, he had the fastest Wifi in the neighbourhood. 

The gasps of adulation

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17 hours ago, The AMOL said:

Is this really a thing? People craving faster W-fi?

Personally, I'm hard-wried with Ethernet, so this is lost on me.

Same here - hard-wired and not interested in slowing down...and at a loss as to why folks would prefer WiFi over plugging in. While it's admittedly a subjective choice and relative to how one uses the Internet, I've always selected plugging in, not only for downstream speeds, but especially for upstream bandwidth. 

Personally, I think WiFi is a terrific convenience for mobile devices, but in general, smaller devices (slower processors, memory, limited bus speeds, etc.) simply can't consume all that bandwidth in the first place. That said, there's no way in hell I'd try to outfit my work station with WiFi, no matter how fast, because it will never be faster than plugging in. WiFi has (and always will have) latency issues that can't be worked around and would be restrictive to me.

In my house, my work station is plugged in and we have a couple of tablets, four mobile phones and a laptop using WiFi. Most of the time, everyone is surfing the net, using social media and streaming videos off YouTube or other services like Netflix. It's not uncommon in the evenings (after 9 pm) for most of these devices to be in use at the same time, so I've throttled WiFi so that my own connection isn't slowed down while I'm working.

The result? The kids and my wife have absolutely no noticeable problem doing their thing with the limited bandwidth available to them, which indicates to me that faster WiFi wouldn't make a difference for them. The need for speed really comes down to what you're trying to accomplish and even then, that "Speed" is rarely needed consistently (for hours/days at a time).

 

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5 hours ago, BIG Mike said:

Same here - hard-wired and not interested in slowing down...and at a loss as to why folks would prefer WiFi over plugging in. While it's admittedly a subjective choice and relative to how one uses the Internet, I've always selected plugging in, not only for downstream speeds, but especially for upstream bandwidth. 

Personally, I think WiFi is a terrific convenience for mobile devices, but in general, smaller devices (slower processors, memory, limited bus speeds, etc.) simply can't consume all that bandwidth in the first place. That said, there's no way in hell I'd try to outfit my work station with WiFi, no matter how fast, because it will never be faster than plugging in. WiFi has (and always will have) latency issues that can't be worked around and would be restrictive to me.

In my house, my work station is plugged in and we have a couple of tablets, four mobile phones and a laptop using WiFi. Most of the time, everyone is surfing the net, using social media and streaming videos off YouTube or other services like Netflix. It's not uncommon in the evenings (after 9 pm) for most of these devices to be in use at the same time, so I've throttled WiFi so that my own connection isn't slowed down while I'm working.

The result? The kids and my wife have absolutely no noticeable problem doing their thing with the limited bandwidth available to them, which indicates to me that faster WiFi wouldn't make a difference for them. The need for speed really comes down to what you're trying to accomplish and even then, that "Speed" is rarely needed consistently (for hours/days at a time).

 

Well. I am very happy with this. I am getting speeds up to 93 megs per second now using wifi on a laptop  (one meg slower than plugged in).  You can get a cheaper brand of this dongle for 16 bucks from amazon that works on a Mac too, just click my link again and look at the other options.

There is no question that a faster speed enhances everything you do online. 

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13 hours ago, BIG Mike said:

Same here - hard-wired and not interested in slowing down...and at a loss as to why folks would prefer WiFi over plugging in. While it's admittedly a subjective choice and relative to how one uses the Internet, I've always selected plugging in, not only for downstream speeds, but especially for upstream bandwidth. 

Personally, I think WiFi is a terrific convenience for mobile devices, but in general, smaller devices (slower processors, memory, limited bus speeds, etc.) simply can't consume all that bandwidth in the first place. That said, there's no way in hell I'd try to outfit my work station with WiFi, no matter how fast, because it will never be faster than plugging in. WiFi has (and always will have) latency issues that can't be worked around and would be restrictive to me.

In my house, my work station is plugged in and we have a couple of tablets, four mobile phones and a laptop using WiFi. Most of the time, everyone is surfing the net, using social media and streaming videos off YouTube or other services like Netflix. It's not uncommon in the evenings (after 9 pm) for most of these devices to be in use at the same time, so I've throttled WiFi so that my own connection isn't slowed down while I'm working.

The result? The kids and my wife have absolutely no noticeable problem doing their thing with the limited bandwidth available to them, which indicates to me that faster WiFi wouldn't make a difference for them. The need for speed really comes down to what you're trying to accomplish and even then, that "Speed" is rarely needed consistently (for hours/days at a time).

 

I used to think like you.  I had 7 computers networked together for no other reason than I could.  I ran servers that I had no use for, I overclocked computers that didn't do CPU intensive tasks, I water cooled processors, chipsets, and video cards for reasons that I forget today.  Wanting every last bit of bandwidth available like you talk about here was right up my alley.

Then I became less of an enthusiast and more of a user.  Right now I am sitting in my office at my desk in which my computer is a few feet from my router, but connected via Wifi.  Why?  Because it works and works well.  I run a business, I stream video, I play Slither.io (I'm addicted), etc.  And I haven't seen one thing hindered by the wireless connection.

I watch 4K video via Roku connected to the Wifi.  I could run a Cat6 cable to it, I am an electrician for god's sake.  But I just don't need it.

I never have buffering issues, my latency is super low (Slither.io tells me that, since I am the best player in the world).

What's my point?  Not sure.  I'm just saying that I see how you are looking at it, but many people just don't see it that way.  If it works and works well, then that's all that matters.

If you are doing something such as uploading video and waiting for it, then it makes a LOT of sense to use the fastest connection possible.  But I can't remember the last time that I waited for a download/upload in which it wasn't limited by the other end.

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2 hours ago, Wirenut said:

I used to think like you.  I had 7 computers networked together for no other reason than I could.  I ran servers that I had no use for, I overclocked computers that didn't do CPU intensive tasks, I water cooled processors, chipsets, and video cards for reasons that I forget today.  Wanting every last bit of bandwidth available like you talk about here was right up my alley.

Then I became less of an enthusiast and more of a user.  Right now I am sitting in my office at my desk in which my computer is a few feet from my router, but connected via Wifi.  Why?  Because it works and works well.  I run a business, I stream video, I play Slither.io (I'm addicted), etc.  And I haven't seen one thing hindered by the wireless connection.

I watch 4K video via Roku connected to the Wifi.  I could run a Cat6 cable to it, I am an electrician for god's sake.  But I just don't need it.

I never have buffering issues, my latency is super low (Slither.io tells me that, since I am the best player in the world).

What's my point?  Not sure.  I'm just saying that I see how you are looking at it, but many people just don't see it that way.  If it works and works well, then that's all that matters.

If you are doing something such as uploading video and waiting for it, then it makes a LOT of sense to use the fastest connection possible.  But I can't remember the last time that I waited for a download/upload in which it wasn't limited by the other end.

We have a Roku and 2 firesticks, two laptops, smart tv. We could already watch HD stuff wirelessly, twice, possibly 3 times over with bandwidth to spare. Only one desktop plugged into the router in the house and a IP phone. Wireless used to be a pain. Now it's much better. It's great to free yourself from all those wires. The cost of an AC dual band router and a dongle if your laptops are a few years old is negligible.  One of the best and cheapest hassle free upgrades I have ever made. What was pretty good just became great. 

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2 hours ago, Wirenut said:

I used to think like you.  I had 7 computers networked together for no other reason than I could.  I ran servers that I had no use for, I overclocked computers that didn't do CPU intensive tasks, I water cooled processors, chipsets, and video cards for reasons that I forget today.  Wanting every last bit of bandwidth available like you talk about here was right up my alley.

Then I became less of an enthusiast and more of a user.  Right now I am sitting in my office at my desk in which my computer is a few feet from my router, but connected via Wifi.  Why?  Because it works and works well.  I run a business, I stream video, I play Slither.io (I'm addicted), etc.  And I haven't seen one thing hindered by the wireless connection.

I watch 4K video via Roku connected to the Wifi.  I could run a Cat6 cable to it, I am an electrician for god's sake.  But I just don't need it.

I never have buffering issues, my latency is super low (Slither.io tells me that, since I am the best player in the world).

What's my point?  Not sure.  I'm just saying that I see how you are looking at it, but many people just don't see it that way.  If it works and works well, then that's all that matters.

If you are doing something such as uploading video and waiting for it, then it makes a LOT of sense to use the fastest connection possible.  But I can't remember the last time that I waited for a download/upload in which it wasn't limited by the other end.

 

42 minutes ago, Lanfear63 said:

We have a Roku and 2 firesticks, two laptops, smart tv. We could already watch HD stuff wirelessly, twice, possibly 3 times over with bandwidth to spare. Only one desktop plugged into the router in the house and a IP phone. Wireless used to be a pain. Now it's much better. It's great to free yourself from all those wires. The cost of an AC dual band router and a dongle if your laptops are a few years old is negligible.  One of the best and cheapest hassle free upgrades I have ever made. What was pretty good just became great. 

True, if l need to download a lot of stuff, l will go to my nearest shopping ctr, wait til after the shops are closed, and download 15 gigs in 20 minutes from there.

Why pay to get optic fibre installed when l can go down there and use it for free?

B)

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1 minute ago, Tagiscom said:

 

True, if l need to download a lot of stuff, l will go to my nearest shopping ctr, wait til after the shops are closed, and download 15 gigs in 20 minutes from there.

Why pay to get optic fibre installed when l can go down there and use it for free?

B)

Good idea, I just need to install a Mall in my backyard.

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4 minutes ago, Tagiscom said:

 

True, if l need to download a lot of stuff, l will go to my nearest shopping ctr, wait til after the shops are closed, and download 15 gigs in 20 minutes from there.

Why pay to get optic fibre installed when l can go down there and use it for free?

B)

I find that most of the downloads are bottlenecked by the other end.  

I get 200mbps download for $50/month so that's plenty.  

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14 minutes ago, Wirenut said:

I find that most of the downloads are bottlenecked by the other end.  

I get 200mbps download for $50/month so that's plenty.  

Yes, some Shopping ctrs, would probably put barriers up so someone isn't going to stream the entire season of Game of Thrones, but the one l am near has no limits.

I had about 50 flyers that l needed to upload to GoogleDrive, it was about 3gigs all up, and would have taken a day or more at home, down there l enjoyed a coffee, and it did the lot in less than 20 minutes.

 

But as Lanfear has pointed out, if you are using high bandwidth regularly, then not so practical.

:P

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12 hours ago, Tagiscom said:

Why pay to get optic fibre installed when l can go down there and use it for free?

Oh, I don't know. Possibly convenience, comfort and a better use of my precious time.

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