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Lanfear63

Nearly 4000 Exoplanets Now Discovered

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SEMrush

I would wish always for licksy treats to home in laser on my spreadsweet yummyhoneyhole, but Dr Roque ain't summonin' my Juicy rn.

Curse my ass for bein' the failedest harlot evah.

Thing is, all orbiture demands gravitas, an' all gravity demands shimmerin' bodies mebbe wanna flux on ovah.

Long as the Cosmos kisses up sweet, idc.

But for sure I would wanna turn back time on alla the plasticstuffs obstructin' nature's mouths an' lungs an' hearts an' life.

How the indestructible becomes the irremovably inevitable ... but for want of space.

Gotta hope any exoplanet vacuumholes gonna suck up way better than shit we offerin' up rn — otherwise infinity's ultimate repository be packin' merely soul-destroyin' trash.

 

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5 hours ago, Lanfear63 said:

The potential for even more restaurants to visit has spurred on Claude's interest in faster than light travel research.

 https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-47681239

And those are just the ones we can detect. Mostly gas giants in close orbit around their Sun. Now that we know how a Solar System forms, it's apparent that at least on planet obits each Sun on average. For example, if you used the same technology to see our solar system from another star,  Saturn and Jupiter would be detected, but none of the rocky inner planets, and not planets so far away (like Uranus and Neptune) from the star, that they don't affect the brightness of the Sun when they orbit.

 

Of the planets already detected, none are close to the size of Earth (they are all many times larger), and only a few might possibly have liquid water. But two moons of Saturn have liquid water that we know of, which means possible life below the surface. And since the elements and chemistry is the same everywhere (that we can observe), probably lots of life out there. 

 

Who knows? Eventually, we will.

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2 hours ago, Claude Whitacre said:

And those are just the ones we can detect. Mostly gas giants in close orbit around their Sun. Now that we know how a Solar System forms, it's apparent that at least on planet obits each Sun on average. For example, if you used the same technology to see our solar system from another star,  Saturn and Jupiter would be detected, but none of the rocky inner planets, and not planets so far away (like Uranus and Neptune) from the star, that they don't affect the brightness of the Sun when they orbit.

 

Of the planets already detected, none are close to the size of Earth (they are all many times larger), and only a few might possibly have liquid water. But two moons of Saturn have liquid water that we know of, which means possible life below the surface. And since the elements and chemistry is the same everywhere (that we can observe), probably lots of life out there. 

 

Who knows? Eventually, we will.

There are a few planets  around the size of the Earth that have been discovered, ranging from 1.2 to 3-4-5 times bigger. One, even around Barnard's star. Highly unlikely that we could stand the gravity but I suppose you could debate the density which are not 100% known factors. 

It shows that you can detect relatively small objects, not just Jupiter sized.

 

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16 hours ago, Lanfear63 said:

There are a few planets  around the size of the Earth that have been discovered, ranging from 1.2 to 3-4-5 times bigger. One, even around Barnard's star. Highly unlikely that we could stand the gravity but I suppose you could debate the density which are not 100% known factors. 

It shows that you can detect relatively small objects, not just Jupiter sized.

 

You're right. I was going by data a few years old. I think there is going to be a special tonight on the Science Channel about the new discoveries of Earth sized planets. My thought, when I hear how these planets are discovered, is that there is very little to go on. A millionth of a percent shift in solar radiation as they pass in front of their star. It's indicative, but not much to go on. 

Another thing we keep hearing is that these planets (and even planets and moons in our own solar system) have "organic molecules". The language used implies that this means that these molecules are produced organically. But chemistry is the same everywhere. And all it means is that they discovered elements that are needed for life to begin. Like hydrogen. And some of these molecules are more complex, but that's a normal result of heat or radiation. Earth was full of organic molecules...but it took a billion years of the first single celled life to emerge. An the only reason that it could was that the planet has a very strong magnetic field. And the only reason we have that is that our iron core spins rapidly, because we had a collision with a Mars sized planet billions of years ago...to set it all in motion. 

And without our magnetic shield, solar radiation would have stripped our atmosphere and oceans long ago.

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I watched the science special on the Science Channel. It showed the 7 planets that are roughly Earth sized circling a red dwarf star 15 light years away. (I think).

But, so far, they can only estimate their size based on the reduction in light from the star when the planets pass in front. A couple of the planets are at the right distance for liquid water.....

But there are a few problems.

A Red Dwarf puts out little sunlight...but it puts out huge amounts of ultraviolet rays. The planets close enough to have liquid water probably have no atmosphere, because of the radiation from the star. The orbits are not circular, so seasons (no clue how fast the planets revolve) could preclude life ever forming.

 

A couple of the planets have a slightly lower mass than if they were just rock, so it's a guess that they may have water. But it's also possible that they just have smaller iron cores.

 

The fact that  the Earth has a large iron core that spins, creating a powerful magnetic field...is just an effect of a glancing collision with a smaller planet, adding to the size of our iron core, causing it to spin, and creating our moon. 

But...there are space telescopes going up soon that may actually give us a visual look at thse planets. Maybe enough to see the chemistry and see if there are byproducts of life.

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